DialogFlow

Some tips for choosing the correct entities in Dialogflow

Recently, on the Dialogflow Product forum, there was this question: There is also a reply by a Google employee, which you should go and read. There are two interesting things about this question: The asker is effectively trying to fit their entire chatbot into a single intent The asker thinks that everything should be an entity (which is probably a direct consequence of point 1) But I was more interested in why someone would think that the entire sentence is full of candidates for entities. In my opinion, you should actually try to use an entity only when you absolutely need to. So how can you decide what should and shouldn’t be an entity? Here are some ideas. Learn about…

DialogFlow

The four types of DialogFlow users

One of my clients had recently mentioned why she chose DialogFlow. “It just seemed to be at the right level of abstraction” That was a good way to put it, but actually I think there are four types of abstraction within DialogFlow with four corresponding types of users. For anyone who wants to work in Dialogflow, it is very good to know which type you are as you choose team members to work with. Type 1 The non-technical user This might be, for example, a business owner or a marketing person who just wants things to work. They are not interested in getting into the weeds of how Dialogflow works. For example, I got this very nice review on Amazon…

DialogFlow

DialogFlow tutorial: Capturing non-English names from user input

In a recent coaching call, a client of mine had some difficulty capturing names using the @sys.given-name entity. In fact, the name which he tried and which failed, was mine 🙂 He replaced the name with @sys.any and was able to capture the name. So he got curious: why not just use @sys.any everywhere? It is not a good idea, and this article will describe why.